It is a wet day yet again. The rain taps lightly, but persistently, on the conservatory roof. Wherever I have been in recent days, the rain has arrived shortly after. I am being to suspect it is following me around. The birds don’t seem to mind. A group of starlings are busy fighting on the bird feeder, while the wet grass it the perfect hunting ground for the darting blackbird.

As I sit listening to the hypnotic drub of the rain above my head, I am lulled into calm reflection. I watch the drips of water dance into the puddles on the path, and large drops of rain slide gracefully down the window. My mind wanders, and I contemplate the rain. It has quite a power, hasn’t it? To both bring and destroy life. We need the rain to water the fields, to fill lakes, and rivers. Too little and life fails to thrive, too much, and it is swept away without mercy. Rain is the bringer, both joy and misery.

 

It’s a rainy morning

And a grey old day

No need to worry

Or hurry away

So sit and listen

To the water tap

Down the glass

A weather rap

Stop and hear

What rain had to say.

So years of misery

Can be washed away

Many wise quotes refer to the lessons we can learn from the rain. The key theme running through many is about turning a negative into a positive. The one I found most interesting was by Bob Marley. ‘Some people feel the rain. Others just get wet.’ I must admit to many times in my life where I have just got wet. The plans haven’t worked out the way I hoped. Circumstances beyond my control throw dark rain clouds over my life’s picnic, and I head for the ‘oh woe is me room’ and lose the key.

This weekend we had planned to take our campervan, head to Northumberland and test it out. One of the things on our bucket list is to see the puffins on the Farne Islands, so we booked a boat trip for the Saturday morning with a company called Billy Shiel’s Boat Trips – I would recommend them for their excellent customer service. However, on the drive up the fuel injector failed, and we lost power to the engine. The trip was cancelled as we were stuck for a few days waiting for repairs. It was disappointing and frustrating. The weather wasn’t great, either.

Yet on reflection, we were only 10 minutes from my Mum’s home, and we managed to limp the van there. A local garage 20 minutes walk from her house fixed the problem, and we believe the part of the engine that failed is covered by a warranty, so hopefully, we won’t be out of pocket. Most importantly, of all the times and moments the engine could have failed, this moment was the best one. For example, not during a planned trip to Denmark later in the summer.

This incident taught me the difference between feeling the rain, but not getting wet. I am quite sure there will be plenty more rainy days and moments to come. Days when my hopes are dashed, and I am left with disappointment – days when the unexpected happens crashing in and forces a change of plan, but I know I can choose my response. I can look for the opportunity. I can look for ‘the learning’. I can look for the better alternative, and I can keep practising this because it is tough at times feeling the rain and not getting wet, isn’t it? Right on cue, the rain is now hammering on the roof of the conservatory where I sit and write. Tonight there will be no glorious sunset, just the sound of rain.  Might be a good time to invest in a pair of wildly decorated wellington boots!

Dealing with disappointment

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